B-29"Enola Gay "Atomic Bomb 1945 By GIANNIS MITZAS

B-29"Enola Gay "Atomic Bomb 1945 


US B-29 Superfortress "Enola Gay" in North Field Airfield, Tinian, In the Marianna Islands, before the attack, the atomic bomb.
August 5, 1945 B-29 Superfortress "Enola Gay" in North Field Airfield, Tinian, In the Mariana Islands, before the attack, the atomic bombing.

August 5, 1945
On August 1, 1945, he was awarded the number 82 "Winner. Painted in black on the tip of his nose and his tail had a black circle. R of the 6th bombing group as a security measure.
On August 5, 1945, Colonel Tibbets took command of this B-29 and named it "Enola Gay" after his mother, Enola Gay Tibbets. The nickname was painted in black block letters on the left side of the nose by Allan L. Karl.
On August 5, 1945, Colonel Tibbets took command of this B-29 and named it "Enola Gay" after his mother, Enola Gay Tibbets. The nickname was painted in black block letters on the left side of the nose by Allan L. Karl.
On August 6, 1945, this B-29 was loaded by the No. 2 atomic bomb. 1 codenamed "Little Boy" atomic bomb. For the mission, this B-29 was flown by Major Charles W. Sweeney, the C-15 crew pilot, who usually flew on the B-29 "The Great Artiste" 44-27353.
He flew from the North Field to Tinyan, which was headed by Colonel Pavlos T. Tibets. Nagasaki was heading to Hiroshima with alternate Kokora targets.
At 08:15 (local time in Japan) from 31,600 ', this B-29 dropped the atomic bomb. 50 seconds later, the bomb exploded. Subsequently. "Enola Gay" returned to North Field Airfield in Tinian at 14:58.
On August 9, 1945, this B-29 was launched by Governor George Marcouard with the B-10 crew on a weather mission. For later bombing target selection. In Kokura City. By the time B-29 "Bockscar" 44-27297 arrived in Kokura The target had been hidden by dense clouds. After three unsuccessful attempts to locate a target. They changed their secondary goal, Nagasaki City.
After the war
 Enola Gay then returned to the United States and operated from Roswell Army Army Air Field in New Mexico. In 1946, during the "Operation Crossroads" he flew to Kwajalein but was not used to dropping another bomb. It was then moved to the Smithsonian Institution, and spent many years parked on open-air aircraft bases. In 1961, he was transferred to the Paul Garber National Airport & Space Space Facility.
Restoration
From 1984 to 2003, the Paul Garber facility was restored to the National Air & Space Museum (NASM). The wings, engine and cockpit were restored by 1995 and placed on the screen. From March to June 2003, the restored pieces were sent to the new Udvar-Hazy Center National Station (NASM). On April 10, 2003, the fuselage and the wings were assembled.
















"Enoia Gay" reminds us that man is capable of doing very, very bad things. Other and very big things. The B-29 was the platform for many newer ones.

Bomber and much more for passengers.



        Giannis Mitzas